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Health News

  • Vaccines for Adults

    Quick—do you know if you’re up to date on your vaccines? Or, do you think of vaccines as just kids’ stuff? Apparently lots of folks do, given that way too few adults receive the recommended vaccines. That puts them—and those who come into contact with them—at greater risk for vaccine-preventable diseases.1 more

     
  • Stay on Top of Asthma Symptoms

    Asthma is a chronic disease. This means that once you develop it, you are likely to have it for a lifetime. A chronic condition like asthma requires daily attention.  Depending on how severe your asthma is, that may include monitoring your breathing and taking medicine every day, even when you do not have symptoms. more

     
  • Who Lives to Be 100?

    According to a recent U.S. Census Bureau report, there were 53,364 people age 100 or older in the country in 2010. Those who were 110 or older made up just 0.6% of the centenarian population in the U.S., the 2010 Census found. more

     
  • Are You Prepared For an Injury?

    It’s smart to keep a first-aid kit in your home and one in your car for quick access to emergency items necessary to maintian or support a victim of either a major or minor accident.   Our phamacists want you to be prepared so bring this list in and our staff will assist you building your own first-aid kit or selecting an appropriate pre-made kit. more

     
  • Fight Back by Kicking the Salt Habit

    An important part of healthy eating is choosing foods that are low in salt (sodium chloride) and other forms of sodium. Using less sodium is key to keeping blood pressure at a healthy level. more

     
  • Experts suggest that every day you should drink at least eight cups of fluid. The bulk of it should be water, but remember that low-fat milk, 100% juices, soups, and decaffeinated teas and coffee also contribute to the daily requirement. What about bottled water? more

     
  • How Much Water Do We Need?

    Experts suggest that every day you should drink at least eight cups of fluid. The bulk of it should be water, but remember that low-fat milk, 100% juices, soups, and decaffeinated teas and coffee also contribute to the daily requirement. What about bottled water? more

     
  • How Does Our Hair Change as We Age?

    How Does Our Hair Change as We Age?

    Hair color change is probably one of the most obvious signs of aging. Hair color is caused by a pigment, called melanin, that is produced by hair follicles. With aging, the follicle produces less melanin.  Graying often begins in the 30s, although this varies widely. Graying usually begins at the temples and extends to the top of the scalp.  more

     
  • Is It a Migraine — or a Sinus Headache?

    Is It a Migraine — or a Sinus Headache?

    Many people confuse a sinus headache with a migraine because pain and pressure in the sinuses, nasal congestion and watery eyes often occur with migraine. To find out if your headache is sinus-related or a true migraine, ask yourself these questions. more

     
  • Don’t Ignore High Blood Pressure

    Don’t Ignore High Blood Pressure

    High blood pressure (HBP) is a serious medical condition that can lead to heart disease, heart failure, stroke, kidney failure and other health problems. “Blood pressure” is the force of blood pushing against the walls of the arteries as the heart pumps blood. If this pressure rises and stays high over time, it can damage the body in many ways. more

     
  • FREE Breast Cancer Screening Event

    Early detection of breast cancer is the key to successful treatment.   If found early, there is a better chance of survival.  HELP SAVE A LIFE and tell the women in your life with a family history of breast cancer or above the age of 40 to schedule a breast cancer screening or mammogram today. more

     
  • It’s Time to “Talk Medications”

    It’s Time to “Talk Medications” with Your Pharmacist

    Pharmacists often conduct medication or “brown bag” reviews (in which the person brings all medications to the pharmacy in a bag) with patients.  If you haven’t had a medication review like this, it might be time to do so. more

     
  • High Blood Pressure

    High Blood Pressure.  You can’t feel it but it can have a big effect on your health.  But high blood pressure (HBP) is a serious medical condition that can lead to heart disease, heart failure, stroke, kidney failure and other health problems. “Blood pressure” is the force of blood pushing against the walls of the arteries as the heart pumps blood. If this pressure rises and stays high over time, it can damage the body in many ways. more

     
  • Is it a regular headache, or a migraine?

    A migraine headache can cause intense throbbing or pulsing in one area of the head and is commonly accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and extreme sensitivity to light and sound. Some are preceded or accompanied by flashes of light, blind spots, or tingling in the arm or leg.

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  • Weight Loss.  Finding a Healthy Approach

    It’s natural for anyone trying to lose weight to want to lose it very quickly. But evidence shows that people who lose weight gradually and steadily (about one to two pounds per week) are more successful at keeping it off. more

     
  • Play It Safe: Store Chemicals and Medications Correctly

    Each year in the U.S., thousands of people suffer from accidental poisoning. They often  require emergency medical care. Household poisonings involve carbon-monoxide fumes, cleaning products, cosmetics and personalcare products, pesticides, medications, and  lants. more

     
  • Men and Depression

    Everyone feels sad or irritable sometimes, or has trouble sleeping occasionally. But these feelings and troubles usually pass after a couple of days. When a man has depression, he has trouble with daily life and loses interest in anything for weeks at a time. more

     
  • Talk with Your Child about Alcohol

    Alcohol is one of the most widely used drug  substances in the world. Alcohol use and binge drinking among our nation’s youth are major public-health problems: more

     
  • Oral Health and Your Pregnancy: What You Need to Know

    There is now evidence suggesting that a woman’s oral health, particularly gum disease, may have an impact on the occurrence of preterm births, resulting in low-birth-weight babies. Pregnant women with periodontal (gum) disease may be seven times more likely to have a baby that’s born too early and too small. more

     
  • Who can picture July 4 in America without fireworks? They’re part of the celebration, of course. But fireworks can be dangerous,  causing serious burns and eye injuries. It’s always best to attend a community celebration where fireworks are handled by the pros. more

     
  • Ban the Burns

    According to a new study, risky sun exposure increases as children age.  Not exactly news for those of you with teens, is it?  Looking at the sun behaviors of 360 fifth graders in 2004 and again three years later, researchers found this: More than half the kids had had at least one sunburn by age 11. And, although half the kids used sunscreen at age 11, only a quarter of 14-year-olds did.1,2 more

     
  • Building Blocks Chewable Multiple – Citrus Flavor

    Building Blocks Chewable Multiple vitamin applies the latest nutritional science to bring you a complete multivitamin specially formulated for weight loss patients. Its quality and bursting citrus flavor, has made it our best selling Multiple vitamin yet. more

     
  • Keeping a Watchful Eye on Aging Parents 

    As your parents enter their twilight years, you may feel as though you don’t want to meddle in their affairs. But when it comes to their health and safety, try not to stay in the dark. By paying attention to any warning signs, you’ll be in a better place to take steps that can help them stay independent as long as possible. more

     
  • Influenza Myths and Facts – Are You in the Know?

    September marks the beginning of the influenza immunization season.  Vaccines are now available in the marketplace and the recommendation of the Center for Disease Control (the CDC) is to vaccinate nearly everyone as soon as possible this year.  But some don’t choose to be vaccinated citing various reasons.  Below are some of the common myths and facts about flu vaccination. more

     
  • What Is COPD? – Smoking Is Major Cause

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is actually a group of diseases that includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. The common characteristic is obstruction to airflow out of the lungs. more

     
  • Choosing Mobility Aids

    Choosing Mobility Aids

    Mobility aids help you walk or move from place to place if you are disabled or have an injury. They include crutches, canes, walkers, wheelchairs and motorized scooters. You may need a walker or cane if you are at risk of falling. more

     
  • Hearing with Clardy – 3 Common Myths about Hearing Loss

    Today there are over 32 million Americans who suffer from some degree of hearing loss.  Yet, only a small percentage of these individuals have sought a professional to have their hearing checked and receive a hearing aid, if needed. more

     
  • Schedule That Mammogram

    October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month— a great time to schedule that mammogram you may have been putting off. If anxiety about possible discomfort has kept you from picking up the phone, try these tips. more

     
  • Your Child’s Health – Know the Facts about RSV

    Your Child’s Health – Know the Facts about RSV

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants and young children. It’s a primary cause of hospitalization for children in the winter and the main cause of diseases, such as pneumonia and bronchiolitis, in young children. Although RSV is rarely fatal on its own, the problems that arise during a bout of RSV can be severe. more

     
  • There’s Help for the Itching and Flaking

    Simple dry skin is the most common cause of dandruff. If this is the cause of yours, you’ll likely have areas of dry skin all over your body. Another frequent cause is irritated, oily skin (seborrheic dermatitis), which is marked by red, greasy skin covered with flaky white or yellow scales. Not shampooing enough can be a culprit. more

     
  • Sure, You Floss … But Are You Doing It Correctly?

    Sure, You Floss … But Are You Doing It Correctly?

    Flossing is simple, but there are certain techniques that will help ensure that you do the best job of taking care of your teeth and gums as possible. The American Dental Association suggests these steps: more

     
  • Is Your Computer Vision-Friendly?

    Is Your Computer Vision-Friendly?

    Changes in vision that occur with age, including restrictions in the amount of light that reaches the eye, can make it more difficult to read a computer screen and handle glare. It may be hard to distinguish between certain colors. Also, many older adults wear bifocals or trifocals, which may affect viewing of a computer screen. more

     
  • Safe Medicine Disposal – Try These Three Easy Steps

    Safe Medicine Disposal – Try These Three Easy Steps

    October is “Talk about Prescriptions Month,” and there’s no better time to learn about safely disposing of leftover medication. The American Medical Association suggests the following steps:

    • Step 1: Sort through prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins and supplements to determine which ones are expired.
    • Step 2: If you are unsure what is in a bottle or package, consider taking the unknown medicine or preparation to your pharmacist or doctor so they can help you identify what it is.
    • Step 3: Safely dispose of expired, unwanted and unused prescription drugs, overthe-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Follow the disposal instructions on the drug label (or the patient information that came with the medicine, if you still have it). Do not flush any drugs down the toilet unless the information instructs you to do so. When in doubt about proper disposal, talk with your pharmacist or doctor. Your pharmacist can also tell you about any upcoming community drug take-back programs where you may drop off medications.

    — Source: American Medical Association

     
  • Women and Smoking: Bad News, Good News

    You’ve come a long way, baby. But really, now, who wants this kind of progress….? Women who smoke are at much greater risk of death from lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) than they were 20 years ago. In fact, deaths from smoking are at an all-time high among women in the U.S. more

     
  • Stress and Heart Disease

    Stress and Heart Disease

    If managing stress is a challenge for you, take heed: More and more research is pointing to stress as a contributor to heart attack and other forms of heart disease. more

     
  • Taking Your Meds the Right Way

    Medications can make a world of difference—if you take them the right way. Half the time, though, this doesn’t happen, at least when it comes to drugs doctors prescribe for chronic conditions.1 more